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Should I Drive Or Fly To My Next Travel Nurse Assignment

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Health Carousel Travel Nursing
March 11, 2022
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What A Travel Nurse Recruiter Recommends

Signing a new travel nurse contract is always exciting! Upon signing the contract, you may find yourself wondering if you should fly or drive to your next destination. There are many factors that may affect your decision and our travel nurse recruiters can help you decide what is best for your travel lifestyle.

Things to Consider

Deciding whether to drive or fly to your next assignment is a personal decision and will be dependent on how close the assignment is to your home state, who you are bringing with you, and how accessible the hospital will be where you will be living. Both driving and flying have their pros and cons depending on your lifestyle. Many nurses opt to drive, rather than ship their car, or rent one when they arrive. Most assignments offer travel stipends, and it’s important to check your contract to see how much of your travel expenses will be covered.

Driving to Your Next Travel Assignment

Depending on how much time you have between assignments and how far your drive is, you may be able to squeeze in a fun road trip and do some sightseeing along the way. When you arrive at your new destination, having a car will enable you to explore your new city and the surrounding areas on your day off without worrying about transportation. Driving also allows you to bring more personal items with you by utilizing your backseat and trunk space to bring anything that will make you feel more comfortable during your stay.

It would make the most sense to drive to your next assignment if you are traveling with a partner, children, or pets. Other nurses may not be up for a long drive or want to add miles or wear and tear on their car and choose to fly instead.

Flying to Your Next Assignment

You may decide that flying is the best way to get to your next destination. Nurses who work in urban areas may enjoy the ease and walkability of city life that doesn't require a car. Determine how far your housing accommodations will be from the hospital and if a car is necessary. If you choose to stay close to the hospital, you may not need a car, can rely on public transportation, or use driving services like Uber to get you to and from work or for exploring your new city on your days off.

Consider using a site such as Walk Score to measure the walkability of your new neighborhood and to find out which conveniences are nearby, such as the hospital, grocery stores, banks, and entertainment.

The downside to flying is that it can be expensive and travel stipends may not cover the entire price of your ticket, or extra luggage. Flying may require you to pack lightly to reduce the likelihood of incurring extra fees. Check your lease agreement to see what is provided for you in your temporary home to decide what you need to bring with you. If you choose to fly, you can ship a box or two ahead of time, or purchase necessities when you get there.


Still unsure whether you should fly or drive to your next travel nurse assignment? Click here to connect with one of our awesome nurse recruiters who can assist you with all of your travel nurse needs.

Author

Lauren Rivera BSN, RNC-NIC is a certified neonatal intensive care nurse. She serves as a nurse expert for a mother/baby telehealth company, and develops content for various nursing sites and fellow healthcare providers. Lauren Rivera BSN, RNC-NIC is a certified neonatal intensive care nurse. She serves as a nurse expert for a mother/baby telehealth company, and develops content for various nursing sites and fellow healthcare providers.

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